About Copenhagen

Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark and what a million Danes call home. This "friendly old girl of a town" is big enough to be a metropolis with shopping, culture and nightlife par excellence, yet still small enough to be intimate, safe and easy to navigate. Overlooking the Øresund strait with Sweden just minutes away, it is a cultural and geographic link between mainland Europe and Scandinavia. This is where old fairy tales blend with flashy new architecture and world-class design; where warm jazz mixes with cold electronica from Copenhagen's basements. You'll feel you've seen it all in a day, but could keep on discovering more for months.


Climate

Copenhagen, as in the rest of Denmark, has four distinct seasons. The best time to visit is definitely the warm period from early May to late August.

Spring, while a bit risky, as no one knows quite when it sets in, can be the best time to visit the city. On the first warm day, usually in early May, Copenhageners come out of hibernation and flock to the city streets, parks, and outdoor cafes in a veritable explosion of life, relieved that the country's dreary and dark winters are finally over. Many locals consider this the high-point of the year.

Summers in Copenhagen are usually warm with an average temperature of some twenty degrees, and the days are long — reaching the a peak of eighteen hours on the 21st of June. If the weather becomes too hot, you can jump in one of the free pools in the cool harbour waters near the centre. Copenhagen's harbor is often considered the world's cleanest urban waterfront. Most of Copenhagen's annual events are held during June and July, and when the sun is out there is always life in the streets.

Autumn and winter have a profound effect on the city. The vibrant summer life withers and the streets go quiet, as most Copenhageners go directly home from work. This is where the Danish concept of hygge sets in, roughly translating into coziness. It is the local way of dealing with the short dark days. Friends and families visit each other for home cooking and conversations by candlelight with quiet music on the stereo. In week 42 the Danes have an autumn holiday, with many events taking place, such as the night of culture. The height of winter is December, where Christmas brings some relief to the short days, with lights and decorations everywhere, in the streets, shops and in peoples' windows. Tivoli opens its doors for the Christmas markets, and most Danes go on a drinking rampage, with the very Danish and traditional Christmas lunches, with work and family.


Rundetaarn

The Rundetaarn (or 'Round Tower' in English) is perhaps the best place in Copenhagen to enjoy panoramic views of the city's skyline with its fairytale old town and many spires. The observation deck is located 35 meters (115 feet) above street level, offering an expansive view of inner Copenhagen

The tower was built by King Christian IV, the famous architectural innovator of Denmark, to be an astronomical observatory. A wrought iron lattice runs along the edge of the platform, featuring Christian IV's monogram. The Rundetaarn was mentioned in two Hans Christian Andersen fairytales and is commonly used as a metric to compare heights of buildings in Denmark.

The iconic Round Tower is located in central Copenhagen, about a 20 minute walk from town hall. Come take a guided tour to learn about the history of astronomy in Denmark in the 17th century and about the tower and library hall that functions as a museum today.


Christiansborg Palace

Christiansborg Palace was once the home of kings and queens, but after one of several great fires, the royal family moved to Amalienborg Palace in the late 1800's and never returned.

The Tower was constructed as part of the third, and present-day, Christiansborg Palace, which was built during 1907-1928. Like the rest of the palace, it was designed by architect Thorvald Jorgensen

With a height of 106 metres, the tower on Christiansborg Palace is the highest tower in Copenhagen - 40 centimetres higher than the city hall tower.

Today Christiansborg, also known as Borgen, houses the Danish parliament, and in June 2014, the tower opened to the public, which means everyone can access the tower free of charge and experience the magnificent views of Copenhagen.


Nyhavn

Especially during summer Nyhavn is the perfect place to end a long day. Have dinner at one of the cosy restaurants or do like the locals and buy a beer from a nearby store and rest your feet at the quayside.

Nyhavn was originally a busy commercial port where ships from all over the world would dock. The area was packed with sailors, ladies of pleasure, pubs and alehouses.

Today the beautiful old houses have been renovated and classy restaurants dominate the old port. Nyhavn is filled with people enjoying the relaxed atmosphere by the canal, jazz music and great food.

No. 9, Nyhavn, is the oldest house in the area dating back to 1681. The design of the house has not been altered since that time. Many of the houses lining the quays of Nyhavn have been the homes of prominent artists.

Hans Christian Andersen used to live in no. 20. This is where he wrote the fairy-tales 'the Tinder-Box', 'Little Claus and Big Claus', and 'the Princess and the Pea'. He also lived twenty years in no. 67 and two years in no. 18.


Frederiksborg Palace

Frederiksborg Palace is situated on three islets in the castle lake in Hillerod, north of Copenhagen. The palace, which is surrounded by the beautiful Frederiksborg Palace Garden, was built in the Dutch Renaissance style at the beginning of the 1600s by King Christian 4.

The Museum of National History at Frederiksborg Palace exhibits the history of Denmark and houses a considerable collection of portraits, historical paintings and modern art.

At the museum you will find portraits of both Johan Friedrich Struensee and Queen Caroline Mathilde made by the artist Jens Juel, as well as other paintings by artists like Karel van Mander, Wilhelm Marstrand, P.S. Kroyer and Niels Strobaek.

A new permanent exhibition shows the history of the castle and the museum - including parts of the castle, previously closed to the public. Here you can see original sculptures and decorations from before the fire in 1859.